I am fascinated by the perversity of nature. My current work casts a critical, scientific, and humorous eye on the mutagenesis of form, from the cellular level to the limb. It examines and celebrates that moment of translation from cerebral to visceral. As in pataphysics, defined as "the virtual or imaginary nature of things as glimpsed by the heightened vision of poetry or science; the science of imaginary solutions" I look to create a new world of imaginative unreality.

Recently I have been exploring the hand of man and the role of science in the natural world. While we develop investigative tools in biology, chemistry, and physics to research and understand our world, those same tools give us the capability of controlling and morphing the environment and ourselves. The catastrophic change that man’s actions have caused to our climate could be rectified if our vast scientific knowledge was matched by political will and implemented towards a remedy. And what about the politics of the body? Our knowledge of genetics and the molecular tools we have created could allow us to eradicate disease, but where is the ethical line? And who gets to draw that line? Who decides what traits are desirable, which to be eliminated? And who gets to utilize these tools of selection?

These questions and concepts weave their way through my work. My goal as an artist is to continue to create engaging and enigmatic work that stimulates conversation and broader questions about science, nature, and the role of humans. The art that I find most intriguing requires of the viewer a mental jump to bridge the synapses: from the concrete to the metaphysical to the sensory, scientific to abstract to imaginary. I aim for my art to effect a visceral reaction, both literally (in actual space) and conceptually (the space between your ears.) In that fraction of time between first seeing and then feeling the trajectory of the work there is a joyous mental “aha” moment. Beyond its conceptual genesis, however, I aim to create work that can reinvent itself according to the viewer’s own experiential connection, and as such becomes universal, transcending a single interpretation.


The portfolio "Gifts" contains examples from a period where I began to create a kind of alchemical medicine. All at once, it seems, friends and family began to have illnesses of all sorts. I decided to create replacement parts for them.  Kidneys for Chad, who awaited a transplant; a uterus for Jean, whose cancer is at bay; an ear for Emily who went suddenly and inexplicably deaf in one ear; a heart for Bret whose failed him in his early forties, lungs for Sylvia and for Karl, each of whom had cancers that won, and so on.

While I was initially using extremely fragile materials in an effort to capture and examine the precarious division between a healthy cell and a dying one, I found that insect wings and sewn leaf skeletons deteriorated far too quickly. My ill friends needed sturdy parts... sturdier than what they received in the first round. I began to work with metal, and to encase the leaves and insects in resin.

As a bit of comic relief for myself, I began the series "Gifts from the Cats". Ironically, as I was giving body parts away, true viscera started to be given to me. Primarily insects and mice, with the occasional rat or bird, my felines provided the medium. They are now imbedded in resin, enigmatic and perfectly preserved jewels. Frozen in time. The two lines of work--the creation of replacement parts and the preservation of the remnants of death--have become intertwined. 

Follow me on Instagram: annette.goodfriend

 

Sections

about

I am fascinated by the perversity of nature. My current work casts a critical, scientific, and humorous eye on the mutagenesis of form, from the cellular level to the limb. It examines and celebrates that moment of translation from cerebral to visceral. As in pataphysics, defined as "the virtual or imaginary nature of things as glimpsed by the heightened vision of poetry or science; the science of imaginary solutions" I look to create a new world of imaginative unreality.

Recently I have been exploring the hand of man and the role of science in the natural world. While we develop investigative tools in biology, chemistry, and physics to research and understand our world, those same tools give us the capability of controlling and morphing the environment and ourselves. The catastrophic change that man’s actions have caused to our climate could be rectified if our vast scientific knowledge was matched by political will and implemented towards a remedy. And what about the politics of the body? Our knowledge of genetics and the molecular tools we have created could allow us to eradicate disease, but where is the ethical line? And who gets to draw that line? Who decides what traits are desirable, which to be eliminated? And who gets to utilize these tools of selection?

These questions and concepts weave their way through my work. My goal as an artist is to continue to create engaging and enigmatic work that stimulates conversation and broader questions about science, nature, and the role of humans. The art that I find most intriguing requires of the viewer a mental jump to bridge the synapses: from the concrete to the metaphysical to the sensory, scientific to abstract to imaginary. I aim for my art to effect a visceral reaction, both literally (in actual space) and conceptually (the space between your ears.) In that fraction of time between first seeing and then feeling the trajectory of the work there is a joyous mental “aha” moment. Beyond its conceptual genesis, however, I aim to create work that can reinvent itself according to the viewer’s own experiential connection, and as such becomes universal, transcending a single interpretation.


The portfolio "Gifts" contains examples from a period where I began to create a kind of alchemical medicine. All at once, it seems, friends and family began to have illnesses of all sorts. I decided to create replacement parts for them.  Kidneys for Chad, who awaited a transplant; a uterus for Jean, whose cancer is at bay; an ear for Emily who went suddenly and inexplicably deaf in one ear; a heart for Bret whose failed him in his early forties, lungs for Sylvia and for Karl, each of whom had cancers that won, and so on.

While I was initially using extremely fragile materials in an effort to capture and examine the precarious division between a healthy cell and a dying one, I found that insect wings and sewn leaf skeletons deteriorated far too quickly. My ill friends needed sturdy parts... sturdier than what they received in the first round. I began to work with metal, and to encase the leaves and insects in resin.

As a bit of comic relief for myself, I began the series "Gifts from the Cats". Ironically, as I was giving body parts away, true viscera started to be given to me. Primarily insects and mice, with the occasional rat or bird, my felines provided the medium. They are now imbedded in resin, enigmatic and perfectly preserved jewels. Frozen in time. The two lines of work--the creation of replacement parts and the preservation of the remnants of death--have become intertwined. 

Follow me on Instagram: annette.goodfriend

 

Sections